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*This could be the spell [[Minerva McGonagall|Professor McGonagall]] used to bring a few suits of armour and school benches to life during the [[Battle of Hogwarts]] so that they could help defend the school (''[[Piertotum Locomotor]]'').
 
*This could be the spell [[Minerva McGonagall|Professor McGonagall]] used to bring a few suits of armour and school benches to life during the [[Battle of Hogwarts]] so that they could help defend the school (''[[Piertotum Locomotor]]'').
 
*This could also be the spell used to animate the chess pieces in Wizard's Chess.
 
*This could also be the spell used to animate the chess pieces in Wizard's Chess.
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==Behind the Scenes==
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*It is possible that the incantation for this spell may be ''Inanimatus Conjurus'', though such is merely a speculative estimate, as in the films, the incantations for the [[Imperius Curse]] and [[Confundus Charm]] are ''Imperius ''and ''Confundus ''respectively, despite the novels stating that the incantations are actually ''Imperio ''and ''Confundo ''respectively.
   
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==

Revision as of 19:29, August 7, 2012

The Inanimatus Conjurus Spell (incantation unknown) is a spell of unknown effect. Professor McGonagall had her fifth-year students write a long essay on this spell as homework in 1995. The name may suggest that this is a spell to bring a non-living object to life.

Possible uses

Behind the Scenes

  • It is possible that the incantation for this spell may be Inanimatus Conjurus, though such is merely a speculative estimate, as in the films, the incantations for the Imperius Curse and Confundus Charm are Imperius and Confundus respectively, despite the novels stating that the incantations are actually Imperio and Confundo respectively.

Etymology

From the English inanimate (+ the Latin suffix -us), meaning non-living and to conjure (+ the Latin suffix -us), meaning to bring up.

Appearances

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